Way to be totally emo and enigmatic, Romeo. Here's he's completely infatuated with Rosaline. When he's not daydreaming about Rosaline in his room, He's moping around in a grove of "sycamore" trees, where those who are sick amour sick with love tend to hang out 1. The thing is, Rosaline has absolutely no interest in Romeo, but he pursues her anyway. Maybe he's not in love with Rosaline as he is obsessed with the idea of being in love—.

ROMEO Love is a smoke raised with the fume of sighs; Being purged, a fire sparkling in lovers' eyes; Being vexed a sea nourish'd with loving tears: What is it else? These are pretty big words coming from a teenager.

All this abstract language—love as "smoke," as "fire," as a "sea," as "madness"—suggest that maybe Romeo knows more about love from books than, you know, actually being in love. She'll not be hit With Cupid's arrow. She hath Dian's wit, And, in strong proof of chastity well armed, From love's weak childish bow she lives unharmed.

She will not stay the siege of loving terms, Nor bide th' encounter of assailing eyes, Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold. Romeo admits that Rosaline has vowed to remain "chaste" like "Diana," the goddess of virginity and hunting. In other words, Rosaline has sworn off boys and sex, which means that Romeo has no chance of winning her heart. What's interesting about this passage is that Romeo sounds a whole lot like a typical "Petrarchan lover.

In fact, Shakespeare's own collection of Sonnets are, in part, inspired by Petrarch's love poetry, which was written about "Laura," a figure who was as unavailable and unattainable as Romeo's current crush Rosaline. In this passage, Romeo says that Rosaline is well "arm'd" against the "siege" of his love and "Cupid's arrow," which is an elaborate way to say that Rosaline is physically and emotionally impenetrable. Log In. Act 1, Scene 1.

Romeo Quote 2. Logging out…. Logging out You've been inactive for a while, logging you out in a few seconds I'm Still Here! W hy's T his F unny?Sign in. Don't have an account? We weren't able to detect the audio language on your flashcards. Please select the correct language below. Add to folder [? Find out how you can intelligently organize your Flashcards. You have created 2 folders. Please upgrade to Cram Premium to create hundreds of folders! You will surely find someone better than her.

Romeo and Juliet Summary and Analysis of Act 1

Flashcards FlashCards Essays. Create Flashcards. Share This Flashcard Set Close. Please sign in to share these flashcards. We'll bring you back here when you are done. Sign in Don't have an account? Set the Language Close.

Add to Folders Close. Please sign in to add to folders. Upgrade to Cram Premium Close. Upgrade Cancel. Shuffle Toggle On. Card Range To Study through.

Put up thy sword, or manage it to part these men with me. An I might live to see thee married once, I have my wish. Too early seen unknown, and known too late! Prodigious birth of love it is to me That I must love a loathed enemy. But this intrustion shall, Now seeming sweet, convert to the bitterest gall.

She is the fairies' midwife, and she comes In shape no bigger than an agate stone On the forefinger of an alderman. From forth the fatal loins of these two foes A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life.

Also highlights his loyalty to Romeo.The scene opens with a brawl on the streets of Verona between servants from the affluent Montague and Capulet households. While attempting to stop the fight, Benvolio Romeo's cousin is drawn into the fray by Tybalt, kinsman of the Capulets.

The fight rapidly escalates as more citizens become involved and soon the heads of both households appear on the scene. At last, Prince Escalus arrives and stops the riot, forbidding any further outbreaks of violence on pain of death.

romeo and juliet act 1 quotes quizlet

After Escalus dismisses both sides, Montague and his wife discuss Romeo's recent melancholy behavior with Benvolio and ask him to discover its cause. Benvolio advises him to forget Rosaline by looking for another, but Romeo insists that this would be impossible. A spirited exchange of vulgar jokes between servants opens the play and immediately links sex with conflict. In their bawdy quarrel, the servants' references to "tool" and "naked weapon," together with repeated images of striking and thrusting, illustrate how images of love and sex are intertwined with violence and death — and will continue to be throughout the play.

The sudden switch from the comedic interplay between the servants to a potentially life-threatening situation demonstrates the rapidly changing pace that drives the action of the rest of the play.

For instance, Benvolio, whose name means "goodwill," tries to act as a peacemaker by dividing the servants, but the quick-tempered "fiery Tybalt" forces him to draw his sword, and the atmosphere changes from harmony to hatred within a few lines.

This undercurrent of uncertain fortune wrenches the characters into and out of pleasure and pain as fate seemingly preempts each of their hopes with another tragic turn of events. When the elderly, hot-tempered Capulet calls for his long sword to jump into a duel with the young swordsmen wielding light, modern weapons, both the absurdity of the feud and the gulf between the old and the young are evident. Both patriarchs are chastised by their wives for such impetuous behavior: "A crutch.

Why call you for a sword? Though Romeo and Juliet try to separate themselves from such archaic grudges and foolish fighting, the couple can't escape the repercussions of the feud, which ultimately deals their love a fatal wound. The second half of the scene switches its focus from the theme of feuding and violence to the play's other key theme, love. Romeo woefully bemoans his plight as an unrequited, Petrarchan lover. The term Petrarchan comes from the poet, Petrarch, who wrote sonnets obsessively consumed with his unrequited love for Laura.

Romeo's feelings of love have not been reciprocated by Rosaline, and this predicament causes him to dwell on his emotional torment. Shakespeare chooses language that reflects youthful, idealized notions of romance. Romeo describes his state of mind through a series of oxymorons — setting contradictory words together — blending the joys of love with the emotional desolation of unrequited love: "O brawling love, O loving hate.

Romeo's use of traditional, hackneyed poetry in the early stages of the play show him as a young, inexperienced lover who is more interested in the concept of being in love, than actually loving another human being.

As the play progresses, Romeo's use of language shifts as he begins to speak in blank verse as well as rhyme. Through this development, his expressions sound more genuine rather than like a poem learned by rote. Shakespeare elevates Romeo's language as he elevates Romeo's love for Juliet.

Romeo's emotional turmoil also reflects the chaos of Verona, a city divided by the feud between the Montagues and the Capulets. Just as the city is embattled by the feud between the families, Romeo is embattled by his unrequited love for Rosaline. These conflicting images of love and violence ominously anticipate the play's conclusion when the deaths of Romeo and Juliet "win" the end of the feud.

I will bite my thumb at them, which is a disgrace to them if they bear it an Italian insult, a provocative, probably obscene gesture. Previous Prologue. Next Scene 2. Removing book from your Reading List will also remove any bookmarked pages associated with this title.

Are you sure you want to remove bookConfirmation and any corresponding bookmarks?No, for then we should be colliers. Ay, while you live, draw your neck out of collar. I strike quickly, being moved. But thou art not quickly moved to strike. A dog of the house of Montague moves me. To move is to stir, and to be valiant is to stand.

To be motivated is to act, while to be valiant is to face a fight. A dog of that house shall move me to stand. That shows thee a weak slave, for the weakest goes to the wall.

The quarrel is between our masters and us their men. I will show myself a tyrant. When I have fought with the men, I will be civil with the maids. I will cut off their heads. The heads of the maids? Ay, the heads of the maids, or their maidenheads. Take it in what sense thou wilt. The heads of the maids or their maidenheads.

romeo and juliet act 1 quotes quizlet

Interpret my comment in whichever sense you prefer. They must take it in sense that feel it. The maids will feel me as long as I can stand upright.

Romeo and Juliet

If thou hadst, thou hadst been poor-john. Draw thy tool! Here comes of the house of Montagues. Draw your sword! Here come some Montague servants.

romeo and juliet act 1 quotes quizlet

My naked weapon is out. I will back thee. Turn thy back and run? Fear me not. No, marry. I fear thee. No, indeedI do worry about you. Let us take the law of our sides.

Let them begin.

'Romeo and Juliet' Act 1 Scene 4 Analysis (part 17 of 50)

I will frown as I pass by, and let them take it as they list. Nay, as they dare. I will bite my thumb at them, which is a disgrace to them, if they bear it. Do you bite your thumb at us, sir? I do bite my thumb, sir. No, sir.The chorus introduces the play and establishes the plot that will unfold. They explain how two families in Verona — the Capulets and the Montagues - have reignited an ancient feud, and how two lovers, one from each family, will commit suicide after becoming entangled in this conflict.

These lovers are Juliet Capulet and Romeo Montague. Only after the suicides will the families decide to end their feud. Two Capulet servants — Sampson and Gregory — loiter on the street, waiting for some Montague servants to pass. They banter, using sexual innuendo and raunchy puns to joke about women, and speak with animosity about the Montagues. They lament that the law prohibits fighting, and wonder how to start a battle legally.

When the Montague servants — Abram and Balthasar — arrive, Sampson bites his thumb at them which is rude but not illegal. Insulted, Abram confronts Sampson and a fight begins. BenvolioRomeo's cousin, arrives to discover the fight in progress. Drawing his sword, he commands them to stop. Then, TybaltJuliet's cousin, walks onto the street. Upon seeing his rival, Benvolio, Tybalt also draws his sword, reigniting the altercation.

Lord Capulet — the patriarch of the family — arrives at the battle, and demands a sword so that he might join in. However, Lady Capulet restrains him, even after Lord Montague emerges ready to fight. It turns out that the Citizens of the Watch have spread word of the street fight, and Prince Escalus arrives before anyone is killed. The Prince chides the Montagues and the Capulets for their mutual aggression, which he believes is making the streets of Verona unsafe. The Prince then orders everyone to return home and cease hostilities at the risk of great punishment.

He personally accompanies the Capulets home. The Montagues and Benvolio remain on stage. The family asks Benvolio where Romeo is, and he tells them that the boy has been in a strange mood lately. When a somber Romeo finally appears, the Montagues ask Benvolio to determine the cause of his melancholy, after which they depart.

When Benvolio asks Romeo about the source of his gloom, Romeo explains that he is pining for a woman named Rosaline, who plans to remain chaste for the rest of her life. This unrequited love is the cause of Romeo's depression. Paris Lord Capulet for permission to marry Juliet, but Capulet insists that Paris should be patient, since Juliet is only thirteen.

However, Capulet does grant Paris permission to woo Juliet and thereby win her approval. Capulet suggests to Paris that he should try to impress Juliet at a masked ball that the Capulets are hosting that evening. Capulet then hands his servant Peter a list of names and orders the man to invite everyone on the list to the party. Out on the streets, Peter runs into Romeo and Benvolio, who are talking about Rosaline. Peter cannot read, so he asks them to help him interpret the list.

Romeo and Benvolio comply, and upon reading the list, they discover that Rosaline will be at the Capulets' party. They decide to attend - even though it is a Capulet party, they will be able to disguise their identities by wearing masks.Shakespeare, W.

Act 1, Scene 1. Romeo and Juliet Lit2Go Edition. Shakespeare, William. Lit2Go Edition.

Romeo and Juliet Act 2 Key Quotes

October 12, SAMPSON True; and therefore women, being the weaker vessels, are ever thrust to the wall: therefore I will push Montague's men from the wall, and thrust his maids to the wall. Draw thy tool! I will bite my thumb at them; which is a disgrace to them, if they bear it.

Turn thee, Benvolio, look upon thy death. I hate the word, As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee: Have at thee, coward! First Citizen Clubs, bills, and partisans! Down with the Capulets! Old Montague is come, And flourishes his blade in spite of me. What, ho! Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word, By thee, old Capulet, and Montague, Have thrice disturb'd the quiet of our streets, And made Verona's ancient citizens Cast by their grave beseeming ornaments, To wield old partisans, in hands as old, Canker'd with peace, to part your canker'd hate: If ever you disturb our streets again, Your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace.

For this time, all the rest depart away: You Capulet; shall go along with me: And, Montague, come you this afternoon, To know our further pleasure in this case, To old Free-town, our common judgment-place.

Once more, on pain of death, all men depart. Speak, nephew, were you by when it began? BENVOLIO Here were the servants of your adversary, And yours, close fighting ere I did approach: I drew to part them: in the instant came The fiery Tybalt, with his sword prepared, Which, as he breathed defiance to my ears, He swung about his head and cut the winds, Who nothing hurt withal hiss'd him in scorn: While we were interchanging thrusts and blows, Came more and more and fought on part and part, Till the prince came, who parted either part.

Right glad I am he was not at this fray. BENVOLIO Madam, an hour before the worshipp'd sun Peer'd forth the golden window of the east, A troubled mind drave me to walk abroad; Where, underneath the grove of sycamore That westward rooteth from the city's side, So early walking did I see your son: Towards him I made, but he was ware of me And stole into the covert of the wood: I, measuring his affections by my own, That most are busied when they're most alone, Pursued my humour not pursuing his, And gladly shunn'd who gladly fled from me.

Adding to clouds more clouds with his deep sighs; But all so soon as the all-cheering sun Should in the furthest east begin to draw The shady curtains from Aurora's bed, Away from the light steals home my heavy son, And private in his chamber pens himself, Shuts up his windows, locks far daylight out And makes himself an artificial night: Black and portentous must this humour prove, Unless good counsel may the cause remove.

MONTAGUE Both by myself and many other friends: But he, his own affections' counsellor, Is to himself—I will not say how true— But to himself so secret and so close, So far from sounding and discovery, As is the bud bit with an envious worm, Ere he can spread his sweet leaves to the air, Or dedicate his beauty to the sun.

Could we but learn from whence his sorrows grow. We would as willingly give cure as know. Come, madam, let's away. Where shall we dine? What fray was here? Yet tell me not, for I have heard it all. Here's much to do with hate, but more with love. Why, then, O brawling love! O loving hate! O any thing, of nothing first create! O heavy lightness!He shift a trencher? He scrape a trencher! Has he even moved or scraped a plate? Away with the joint-stools, remove the court-cupboard, look to the plate.

Good thou, save me a piece of marchpane, and, as thou loves me, let the porter let in Susan Grindstone and Nell. Clear away the stools, sideboards, and plates. My friend, save me a piece of marzipan, and if you love me, have the porter let in Susan Grindstone and Nell.

Antony and Potpan! Ay, boy, ready. You are looked for and called for, asked for and sought for, in the great chamber. We cannot be here and there too. Cheerly, boys. Be brisk a while, and the longer liver take all.

Be cheerful, boys. Be quick for a while, and may the longest lived take everything. Welcome, gentlemen! Ladies that have their toes Unplagued with corns will walk a bout with you.

Ah, my mistresses! Which of you all Will now deny to dance? Am I come near ye now? And turn the tables up, And quench the fire. The room is grown too hot. Welcome, gentlemen. Ha ha! My ladies, now which of you will refuse to dance now?

Have I hit the mark? Once there was a time when I could wear a mask and charm a girl by whispering a story in her ear. No more, no more, no more. You are welcome gentlemen. Come, musicians, play. Make room!

Dance, girls. Move the tables out of the way. No, sit, sit, my Capulet cousin. How long has it been since you and I last wore masks?